Tag: force free

Keeping my Sanity!

Keeping my Sanity!

October was a crazy month! Most of you know I got married on the 14th, and weddings take up a ton of time. The day was perfect, but it took a ton of planning and coordinating to make that happen. With Cargo at home, I also had to make sure that she was not missing out on the socializing that is so important with a young puppy. Anytime there was a training opportunity to get some errands run, and play with the puppy, I took advantage. Visit one of my bridesmaids at the barn? We met the pony and the chickens while we were there. Vendor is near the park, 20 mins playing on the trails built into that trip! Walk through at the venue, yep puppy tagged along. We managed to make it to one Puppy class locally, so she got to play with a few puppies and work on her focus for a little bit. Even with those little trips I still feel like she was still getting the exposure to things that she needed during that critical time.

IMG_20171021_164246038

At home, my monster puppy did not understand that it was not playtime 24/7! I had to get some stuff done, so I planned out each of her 3 meals to be something that was mentally stimulating. This helped give her something to do, and keep her quiet while I was making phone calls or writing emails. Thankfully, puppies also sleep quite a bit at 12 weeks old so I took full advantage of that as well! Slow feeder for breakfast meant that the meal took about 15 minutes to finish, and all that effort usually gave me an hour of her napping afterwards. Lunch was usually a frozen Kong, zogoflex (west paw toy) or busy buddy (petsafe) that she would work on for a bit in her kennel if I was gone for appointments or running errands. Dinner was a wobbler or kibble in a box. She learned pretty quickly to knock the wobbler around to get the food out, and if you have ever watched a pup play with the wobbler, you can hear them scratching on it while they are playing with it. That meant I could get our dinner made while listening to her play with her dinner for a good 15 minutes. Those of you with puppies understand how amazing 15 minutes of occupied puppy can be!

We also played a bit between these sessions. Cargo learned how to fetch the ball, target her tug toy and not my hand, play with the thing that I am playing with, go into her kennel willingly, and most importantly, her name. Each of these were done in 5 to 10 minute sessions, and would wear out her brain and let her sleep a little more soundly.
These lessons were also applied to my older dogs. I felt guilty that the little bit of time I did have, was spent with the puppy, so they also rotated playing with the wobblers, food in boxes, or kongs while I was getting things done. Now that the wedding is done, and I have a little more time back, I am still applying these things to make sure my dogs are getting the mental work that they need.

The busy holiday season is upon us, so I want to challenge you this month to add in a few enrichment games to your dog’s day. Get creative and post your dog playing on my Facebook page! There will be a winner in December for the person with the most posts! Winner will be announced December 18!

If you are not already following my Facebook Page, check it out here: Facebook

Advertisements
Why it’s Absolutely Okay to Avoid the Dog Park!

Why it’s Absolutely Okay to Avoid the Dog Park!

Do you stare longingly at your pup wondering if he’s happy laying at your feet chewing on his bone?

Do you wonder if he needs more socializing in his life?

Every dog wants to play with other dogs, right?

I work with quite a few dogs who just lose it at the sight of another dog. I’m talking jumping, barking, pulling on the leash, and otherwise doing the exact opposite of what you would like them to do when this scenario comes up. (If this embarrassing scene is happening to you, contact me, or a local force free trainer in your area. We can help!)
Many of these dogs act this way because they are, in fact, afraid of the other dogs approaching them. For your dog, acting this way gets the other dog to go away, because there is absolutely no way you are going to walk over to that person to explain why your dog is loosing his $@**.

Most pet parents also have the idea in their head that dogs should have doggy friends. They should be able to be social at the dog park or doggy daycare in large groups of dogs and still keep a cool head. If you have one of those dogs, consider yourself lucky!

Here is an example I like to use when explaining this to people:
Some people like to go to the bar every weekend. Some people like to sit at home with their dogs on the weekends, and some people like to have a few close friends over to play a game or watch a movie.

Is one option better than the other? It depends on who you ask. If you ask me, I’ll be at home on Saturday night with my dogs every single time! Now, I go to the club once a year because I like my friends and I want to hang out with them, but asking me to go every weekend is going to just wear me out!

Now let’s look at your dog. If he is freaking out at one new dog from 100 yards away, I don’t think he’s going to like going to the “bar” where there are 30 dogs on top of him all at once. Your dog may learn to enjoy one or two doggy friends in his lifetime, or he might be a dog who doesn’t want friends. Both of those options are okay!

Society puts a lot of pressure on dogs to be super friendly and A-Okay 100% of the time. No one can hold up to those expectations. Take an honest look at your dog, and decide if your dog as an individual is okay with doggy friends. If your honest answer is “no” or “not right now,” that’s okay! Your dog just heaved a sigh of relief that you are not going to ask him to do something he’s not ready to do!

This concept is the root of my training philosophy. Is your dog ready and capable of making good choices in this situation? If not, then we need to train some more to get him ready, or we need to decide if this position is one that your dog needs to encounter. Then determine the best way to help your dog cope with this decision.

Find things that truly do make your dog happy, and pursue those options. Does he enjoy swimming, or playing ball with you? Make sure he gets the opportunity to have those social interactions with you, and having doggie friends becomes farther down the list of requirements for a happy life.
For more insight to my struggles with Pixie’s reactivity, check out my past blog posts!
Until next time, make good choices!

4 Tips for an Effortless Dog Walking Experience

4 Tips for an Effortless Dog Walking Experience

Most of us live in neighborhoods where a nice evening stroll to the park or by the water is something we could easily do with our dogs, and most of us with dogs, want to make that part of our daily life. When we got our dogs, we also envisioned an exercise partner who was ready to wander the beach with us in the spring, and walks in the park on a nice loose leash.

What happens when the dog has other ideas? We tell ourselves walking the dog is something we need to work on, and we will take care of that tomorrow. We come home from work exhausted and don’t feel like having the dog drag us down the street. Then days go by and weeks, and no one is going for a walk. (I’ve been there!)

Here are my 4 tips for getting you and your pup back outside and enjoying your time together!

  1. Help your dog focus!

Dogs see the world much differently than we do. They use their sense of smell to analyze things before their other senses even begin registering what’s happening. If you are opening the door and Rocky is off like a rocket, then practice your focus before you leave the house. Start with a leashed dog at the door you usually take them out to walk. Ask for a “sit” and wait until you have a seated pooch. Reward that sit and begin to open the door. If they get up then take your hand off the door and wait for them to sit back down. Wait to see what decision they make before you immediately prompt another sit.

Once you have begun to open the door do you see a dog whose nose is now twitching 100 miles an hour? Rocky is now smelling all the smells that he can get through his nose from that tiny crack in the door. Your job right now is to let him sniff!!

  1. Wait until your dog is ready!

When your pup has done all his sniffing at the door, he will most likely look up at you to say “hey, why aren’t we going anywhere” Reward that eye contact! The more time you give your dog to sniff the birds, bees, grass, cars, people, temperature, dogs who have walked down the street, rode by in the car, bicycles, wildlife… (you get the idea) the quicker they will begin to recover, and offer that eye contact. Giving your pup time to analyze where he is and where he is going will make the walk more enjoyable for both of you because pup will not be distracted by all the sniffs and be able to pay better attention to you. Be patient!

  1. Reward what you like!

Reward your dog while he still has his brain in his head to learn. Most of the time, when dogs start to pull at the leash they have run out of brain space to remember you at the other end of the leash. Remember all those smells your dog was sniffing when we got to the door? They change as you get farther from the door! If you are getting close to the mailbox, and Rocky is pulling, turn around and go back to the house and start over. Rewarding what you like will keep your dog checking in with you until the smells take over. Check out this video of Duke learning how to walk with a nice loose leash.

Duke Golden

  1. Set a timer not a distance!

Most of our frustration with walking our dog comes from not getting anywhere. All of our cell phones, have a timer on them. Set the timer for a length of time you are comfortable with. 5 to 15 minutes is usually my goal for any training sessions.  In those 5 minutes, you get as far as you can, then pack up and go home. If you sit at the back door sniffing for your 5 minutes, well then, that was your “walk” today. Congratulate yourself for training the dog!

With time and practice you will begin to get farther and farther down the driveway and into the neighborhood. It will also take your dog less time to check in with you when he does lose his brain.

If you liked these tips, and would like to work on enjoying your walks with your pup, contact me through my website http://www.thefreckledpaw.com

Check out more tips and cute pups on Facebook and Instagram