Tag: fear free training

The Secret to Loose Leash Walking!

The Secret to Loose Leash Walking!

My secret to Loose Leash Walking!

The ultimate goal!! To have a dog who doesn’t drag you down the street! Who listens when you are tethered together. The one skill that every 6 to 8 month old puppy owner is wishing they had the magical answer for!

Somewhere I read that teaching your pup to walk on a loose leash was just the same as teaching any other trick. That clicked for me, the dog trainer, but my clients look at me like I have 3 heads. (There is that glassy look that I was talking about in my Trigger Stacking article) Follow me here!

Remember when you were teaching your pup to sit? He learned first in front of the cookie jar because jumping up at you was not a good idea. Brilliant pup! Then you moved into the living room and asked for a “sit” and got the blank stare?

Yeah that blank stare!

Dogs have a hard time generalizing what you are asking of them, unless you ask them for things in lots of different places.  Add in all the new exciting smells of the world and your puppy has no brains left to give you!

Take a look outside to the sidewalk. See all those individual squares? Those are all different places for your pup, with new smells and different experiences. That means you have to tackle a loose leash on every single one of those squares until your pup gets the idea. Don’t worry, with some consistency on your part, this will go quicker than you imagine.

Homework!

Start inside the house. Yep! Leash puppy up and walk around the kitchen then the living room and down the hallway. If there is any pulling on the leash just stop and wait for puppy to look back at you with that blank stare. Reward puppy right at your side where you would have a nice loose leash. I aim for the seam of your pants. If cookie shows up at your side, then puppy is going to want to stay at your side to get those cookies.

The other secret is to set a timer for your session. 5 mins for baby puppies, maybe 15 mins for older puppies. Heck, maybe you only have 5 mins of patience, it’s better than nothing!

Once your inside walking is great, start moving toward the door you would like to begin to go out for a walk. Same rules apply! If you feel any pulling, you stop and wait for puppy to look at you. The first time you venture out the door, you might be walking one very long step at a time, but the more consistent you are, the faster your puppy will pick up on the concept that pulling means you stop.

Set the timer! If you only make it to the mailbox in 20 mins, well, that is your pups walk for the day. Having them think about what they are doing is so much better than letting them drag you around for 20 mins. You are also one day closer to meeting your goals!

The Secret!

Practice! Sorry, I wish my magic wand worked for this one. If your pup is struggling to get down the driveway, go back to something easier like the front door. Once you turn around and go back to a place that your dog has already had the chance to investigate, then they have more brain to give you. When they walk with a nice loose leash back to the door, then tell them what a brilliant puppy they are! Feedback is so important!!

At the end of the day there are 100 different ways to reach the end result. Hopefully, this gives you some idea on how to get started!

2017 and the holes in 2016

2017 and the holes in 2016

It’s 2017. Is anyone else wondering how that happened? I will tell you that I am definitely that person who still thinks 10 years ago was 1996. A client’s 7 year old son was singing “baby got back” at an appointment today, and I realized how long that song has stood the test of time. (Go ahead and google when that was released…1992… yeah… think about that for a second)

That being said, I realized I’ve had Pixie for 4 years and Opie for 2 years come March (time flies when you are having fun). Pixie was never meant to be a sporting dog and I raised her with the intention that she would be adopted out into a pet home where she would live out her days sleeping on the sofa. She knew she was never leaving.

2015 was the year I decided to keep her and try out some dog sports. It’s also the year I broke her. She has a natural drive, and the pit bull willingness to do anything I asked her. She learned what I wanted from her quickly, and my inexperience in sports caused me to push her into more than she really was capable of handling. I have kept or fostered numerous dogs and trained them to be appropriate pets, but the stress and chaos of competition is still relatively new to me. Her drive and willingness to please masked her fear of new situations, and new people, both of which she had to deal with when competing.

Raising a sport dog is very different than raising a pet, and Pixie started off with quite a deficit. She is so stoic and willing that I didn’t realize what was going on until her extreme reactivity began to surface in the winter of 2015. (More on that here: I hate walking my dog)

2016 was then dedicated her reactivity and making her feel more secure with her environment. I also discovered her food sensitivity and how that was contributing to her crappy attitude. We competed very little, but competed in new venues where I could control the chaos in her experience. The more I worked with her the more I realized that the fundamentals in our relationship were what was broken. She loved dock jumping but was so overwhelmed by the chaos in the atmosphere that she could not think through what I was asking her. My frustration with her was not helping either.

Training sessions have moved from strict conditioning and management of her reactivity to just hanging out and trying to get some focus to work in a new place. The bar has been lowered tremendously and I am beginning to enjoy the dog things that I love with her. Going to the park to walk is not a detailed plan to rival that of a Navy SEAL mission, it’s actually a walk, and some play and some focus. I enjoy it. Pixie enjoys it. It’s far from perfect but definitely not a panic situation that it used to be.

We will continue with this new training path to see where it brings us. I have a good feeling 2017 will be about filling the holes and enjoying the time with my dog. I have learned to adjust my expectations and give Pixie clear indications of what I am asking. Work is work, she has to work when I ask, but I will make sure she is ready and feeling secure in her surroundings. I am her person and I want to know that I will keep her safe.

If you see us in a field or in a parking lot just hanging out, know that we are training, maybe subtle skills, but we are training. I am dedicating this year to as much foundation training as we can. Maybe by 2018 we will be back on track, or we will have a new goal, either way, I will be enjoying the dog I am with.

 

Crate Training… Do it Now!

Got a new puppy? Crate Train them!

Got a newly rescued dog? Crate Train them too!

Got an older dog who is trusted inside the house? Make sure they are still comfortable inside their crate!

Think crates are “mean” and “jail” for your dog? Get over it!

I have to say that 60% of the issues that I see with my clients can be greatly improved by their dog being crate trained at a young age. Crates don’t have to be jail like, and your pup will actually appreciate a place to go when they are feeling overwhelmed or need some space. Don’t you like to have a few minutes to yourself?

Puppies should be taught at a young age, that their crate is a place to go to relax. Just like a toddler at a birthday party, sometimes the young ones don’t know when to cool it. Anyone who has raised a puppy knows that sometimes they get so overstimulated that they lose their brains, and need a quick time out to find them again.

Housebreaking? That’s a job in itself! No one can have their eyes on a 9 week old puppy 24 hours a day, I mean sometimes you have to blink! The solution: crate time with a chew or stuffed Kong so puppy does not make any mistakes in training.

Overly friendly adolescent? Practice meeting people on leash when they come in the door. If they fail at keeping all 4 feet on the floor 3 times, then crate until they calm down.

Bringing a new dog in the house? Allowing some crate time for the new dog to get acclimated with their new surroundings or new family members is a great way to make the transition go smoothly!

Need to run out of town on emergency? Your friends will be much more willing to watch your dogs if they can be safely crated while they stay!

Did your dogs get into an ugly fight? Crate and rotate until wounds are healed and the cause can be addressed by a professional!

I could seriously go on for days about the benefits of crating your pup! My dogs love their crates, and we make going in and coming out a game to give them positive associations with it.

Look at all the crating happening here! Crating at a trial, crating with a friend, crating when a friend is too crazy and needs a nap, crating to recover from an injury. All things that may not be a normal part of life for you, but definitely will make your life easier!

If you have a dog that does not love his crate, or a new puppy that you would like to get started with crate training, contact me today! The Freckled Paw