So you think you want a puppy?

So you think you want a puppy?

The holidays are a popular time to get a puppy, or adopt a new four- legged member of the family. Puppies are really cute, and super fun for the whole family to take responsibility of. Their floppy ears, and wonky legs make everyone laugh and post a million pictures on Instagram.
Getting a puppy means once you get through the puppy stage, everything is perfect right? You get that wonderful dog that hangs out in the front yard, and can be walked easily around the neighborhood, never bothering anyone, or causing a problem. Yep, get a puppy, and you can raise it how you want it and everything will be grand!

Haha! I wish it was that easy!

Over the next few weeks I will be offering puppy tips to make sure you are looking for the right puppy for your family, and are prepared to set puppy up for success when you bring him home. I will cover many of the things that people often contact me about, when they bring puppy home and then feel the puppy paralysis of “what have I done?!” and then “what do I do about this?!”
If at the end of the series, I have totally talked you out of a puppy, I will go over what to look for in an adult dog, and how to navigate the overwhelm of the shelter environment, or find a reputable rescue to adopt your pup from.

A dog joining your family is a 10+ year commitment. Make sure you can look ahead and your pup can cope with any life altering situations over the next 10 years. Marriage, having kids, moving, changing jobs are all big changes for people! Living near the largest military base on the east coast, I can’t tell you how many times “deploying” shows up on the surrender form at the shelter. Craigslist is full of pets needing a place to go because the person planning to keep the pups for 6 to 10 months suddenly can’t commit to that time frame any longer. If you are military or have job that requires travelling more than occasionally, make sure you plan the cost of boarding or petsitter into the cost of your pup.

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If one of these situations might be in your future, fostering for a reputable rescue might be a better option. Reputable rescues have a network of people willing to watch your pup while you travel or will cover the cost of boarding for your trip. They will also cover medical care and food while you are housing the pup. You provide the love and they spend the money. It’s a win win win situation for you, the dog, and the rescue!
I have fostered 7(ish) dogs in my lifetime, and only kept one. (Pixie is the worst, and I am the only one that would put up with her crap) I cry each time they leave, even if I am really excited to see them go. The satisfaction of knowing that I have helped them on their journey to a forever home, keeps me in the game. Each of the dogs I have fostered, would have done terribly in a shelter situation, or I pulled them from the shelter, to give the other dogs there a better chance at adoption. Shelters do a great job of housing the pets in their care, but the door never closes. There is always another dog coming in the door, and if I can help get one out, then I have done my small part.
If a puppy is part of your plan for 2018, then stay tuned! I will offer all of my tips and plan for getting you started off on the right track and make sure you have set your family up for success, and planned for every possible outcome before puppy comes home!

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